EU Cookie Law

This website uses cookies to manage authentication, navigation, and other functions. By using our website, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

The concept of shower toilets, and the associated “wellness” they bring, is becoming more widely understood- and accepted- even beyond the ‘disability’ world.

pv wetroomIt’s logical after all, and relevant whether or not one has, or acknowledges, a limitation or disability. What is more likely to clean effectively- wiping with a bit of tissue, or washing?
The inherent, improved hygiene of washing almost goes without saying. Indeed, in Japan, for example, the shower toilet is as accepted as ‘tech’ as flat screen TVs are in the UK.

But, as with any piece of ‘tech’ one needs to research for the most appropriate for your needs. Not all offer the same features and benefits, the same performance. As with any piece of technology, influencing considerations will be budget and longevity of use.

The primary considerations should address ease of use, and efficiency of wash. If it’s push button, how easy are those buttons to operate, and will you still be able to use them in a decade or so? How well does it wash- that includes both the angle of the douche and the quantity of water used in the flushing and douching processes.

Secondary issues may be whether or not not dries after washing, whether it can accommodate changing needs. Do you want to ‘drip dry’, for example? Or would integrated drying be better? Not all shower toilets offer a drying function. A shower toilet is not a cheap piece of kit, that you will blithely go and replace in a couple of years when your arthritis, for example, limits your ability to operate it, so can it be accessorised to accommodate such health deterioration?

And like any piece of tech, what backup, support is available should you have problem?

One thing is for certain: no two people are alike. We all have different needs. Our bladder and bowel moves differently, with different levels of ease and frequency. Despite traditional British reluctance to discuss bladder & bowel movements, they affect all of us, daily, and several tines a day. So going to the loo can have a huge impact on our life.

It’s worth, therefore, whether or not we have a limitation, investing a little time and effort to choose a fixture that can enhance our daily life and intimate hygiene.

We invest in a TV. Why not with a WC too?