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Mark SadlerIt’s a fact of life that, with each day that passes, we change, as we age. Whether or not we view ourselves as disabled, those changes impact on our ability to live life. But with typical British stoicism, we just ‘get on with it’, we ‘manage’.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. We have the technology to make small changes, adaptations to our homes, that enable us, regardless of age, to get on with life, independently and with style. 

Much of it is about a change in attitude. Think about it, in the 1960s no-one would have dreamed of having a bidet in the bathroom. Yet less than a decade later, as foreign travel became more accessible, it became the aspiration, and then almost ‘the norm’.

To us straight-laced Brits, it is slightly weird to have a WC that washes your bum. Yet to the Japanese, it is ‘the norm’: they spend the time and effort choosing a wash & dry toilet that we spend choosing a TV. In many cultures, us British are the weird ones for thinking it’s practical and hygienic to wipe our bottoms with a bit of paper rather than wash clean afterwards. Think about it logically, would you clean the rest of your body that way i.e. with paper? Or would you use water i.e. a bath or shower? 

We sit in the bath, yet stand in the shower. Why not sit in the shower? It’s certainly safer! And most shower seats fold against the wall, so do not impact on use of the shower if other members of the household still prefer to stand. 

We rub ourselves dry with a towel yet dry hair with warm air. Why not add style and save laundry bills? If you have mobility or skin issues, using a body drier is a viable alternative. 

So, in the bathroom at least, we don’t have to ‘just manage’. Any one of a number of small changes/ adaptations would give you the ability to perform your daily (or more regular) ablutions safely, with enhanced hygiene, and without having to rely on anyone to help you.